MEC head office

We’re an innovative place, and our Head Office building demonstrates that. It’s about 70% more energy efficient than a conventional office, and designed to a LEED Platinum Standard. It is located next to transit, across from a park and in the path of a greenway and multiple bike routes. With big windows, tons of natural light, showers, change rooms, and storage for 128 bikes, it embodies the values and culture of MEC.

Serving more than 4 million members is a huge undertaking. When our employees love where they work, they happily support members living active outdoor lifestyles.

Office hours are Monday to Friday: 8:30am – 4:30pm

Phone: 604.707.3300
Fax: 604.731.6483

1077 Great Northern Way,
Vancouver BC V5T 1E1

Our office is a scent-free environment. Please refrain from wearing perfume or scented products when you visit.

Vendor and sourcing inquiries

Although MEC doesn’t enter into partnerships to develop products, we’ll accept a sales package if you have a new and innovative product ready for retail sale. Send inquiries to and the right person in our Buying and Design Department will review it and contact you if we’re interested.

We’ll also accept email at from factories interested in sourcing opportunities.

Green features

Estimated to be 70% more energy efficient than conventional commercial buildings (based on the Model National Energy Code for Buildings, or MNECB), its features include natural lighting, energy efficiency and monitoring, passive cooling, heating and ventilation, and a high-performance building envelope. Outdoor amenities include water management, extensive landscaping, walking paths, seating and a rooftop patio with vegetable planters and fruit trees.


The building is basically a kit of mountable and demountable parts. It was assembled in pieces and can be taken apart at the end of its useful life. Structurally, glue-laminated timber columns and beams and composite wood assemblies for floors, walls, and roof figure prominently. Most wood materials were sourced from within the region. The timber structure is relatively light, which reduces the amount of concrete and steel needed to carry sheer loads and withstand seismic activity.


The form of the space influences its energy performance: narrow floor plates deliver natural light and Solera windows enhance its distribution, reduce glare, and provide a thermal barrier. Walls and roofs (rated to R-50 and R-70) round out the high-performance building envelope.

Heating and cooling is provided through a series of 20 geo- thermal wells that are optimized through a ground source heat pump. Incoming fresh air is tempered through ceiling-mounted hydronic heating and cooling panels.

A passive ventilation system draws fresh air through three vertical stacks. Air enters in high volume from the rooftop and then is dispersed at low velocity through vents in the raised floors on each level.

The location (near transit, along a greenway, across from a park) was specifically chosen for the opportunities it provides employees to bike or bus to work, and to exercise in the nearby green space. A bike storage room has space for 128 bikes, or one bike for every two employees.


A “blue roof” captures rainwater in a 7,700 gallon underground cistern. The water is used for flushing toilets and irrigating the rooftop garden, providing up to 80% of non-potable water needed (reducing potable water used by 55%).

Seasonal rains and storm water is managed through interconnected swales with plants that filter particulate and absorb excess runoff before water is discharged to the municipal sewer system.

Landscaping uses native and waterwise plants to reduce the need for irrigation. Grasses, wildflowers and rose hedgerows provide habitat and food for songbirds. High canopy trees along the boulevard and Central Valley Greenway provide shade from the summer sun and soak up moisture.


Two slender intersecting bars define the form are designed to optimize light penetration and take advantage of sunlight throughout the year. Narrow floor plates ensure that natural light penetrates to the centre of the building.

Artificial lighting is needed for few hours of the days and very little at all on sunny days. Occupancy sensors control lighting in enclosed spaces to further reduce electricity loads.